Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie to livestream Baltic Sea Philharmonic ‘Waterworks’ concert on 29 August

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s first ever concert at the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg will be livestreamed on the venue’s website www.elbphilharmonie.de/de. The performance, at 8.00 pm CET on Tuesday 29 August, marks the end of the orchestra’s pioneering ‘Waterworks’ tour of Denmark and Germany with conductor Kristjan Järvi. The concert is already sold out, with an audience of 2,100 expected at the Elbphilharmonie, so the live stream will give even more people the opportunity to experience the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s bold new fusion of music, lighting, projection art, fashion and sound design. In addition, the performance will be broadcast live on a giant screen to spectators in the Plaza outside the Elbphilharmonie, and will be shown a further three times during the Hamburg Cruise Days festival from 8 to 10 September.

The ‘Waterworks’ programme includes one of the most famous of all water-themed pieces – Handel’s Water Music, in a special arrangement featuring variations by contemporary composers Charles Coleman and Gene Pritsker. The orchestra also celebrates the 80th birthday of American composer Philip Glass by performing his Aguas da Amazonia – in a new orchestration by Charles Coleman – and his Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’, with Russian-born violinist Mikhail Simonyan as soloist. The concert at the Elbphilharmonie will include a special collaboration with the girls’ choir Mädchenchor Hamburg from Jugendmusikschule Hamburg, in which the 60-strong choir will perform an encore with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic.

‘Waterworks’ heralds an exciting new era for the Baltic Sea Philharmonic, with the introduction of an immersive concert show format. The orchestra has collaborated with lighting designer Bertil Mark, projection artist Philipp Geist, sound designer Chris Ekers and a team from Sunbeam Productions to transform the concert experience for audiences. The musicians also have a striking new look on stage, thanks to a clothing collaboration with Monton, a leading brand of Estonian fashion house Baltika Group.

You can also follow the livestream via the Facebook page of the Baltic Sea Philharmonic: www.facebook.com/BalticSeaPhilharmonic

Read More

Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s ‘Waterworks’ concert in Berlin to be livestreamed

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s ‘Waterworks’ concert with Kristjan Järvi in Berlin this Friday, 25 August 2017, will be livestreamed by European cultural channel Arte. The performance at the city’s Konzerthaus, at 8.00 pm CET, is part of the Young Euro Classic festival, which Arte (Concert.arte.tv/young-euro-classic) is covering with live streams of seven concerts. Arte’s coverage is especially welcome given that the Berlin concert is sold out, with 1,600 people expected at the venue. Together with the live-stream audience, they will experience an innovative concert show that fuses music, lighting, projection art, fashion and sound design.

The Berlin concert is the first of four performances in Germany in the next days for the Baltic Sea Philharmonic, as it continues its pioneering ‘Waterworks’ tour. The ‘Waterworks’ adventure began in May with a series of enthusiastically received concerts in Hattingen, Germany, and Copenhagen and Aarhus in Denmark. After Berlin, the orchestra will next perform in Peenemünde, on the island of Usedom, on 26 August, then in Lutherstadt Wittenberg on 27 August, and finally at Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie on 29 August.

You can also follow the livestream via the Facebook page of the Baltic Sea Philharmonic: www.facebook.com/BalticSeaPhilharmonic

Read More

Baltic Sea Philharmonic and Kristjan Järvi resume pioneering ‘Waterworks’ tour in Germany

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic and Kristjan Järvi kick off the second half of their groundbreaking ‘Waterworks’ tour tomorrow with a performance at Berlin’s Konzerthaus as part of the Young Euro Classic festival. The orchestra debuted ‘Waterworks’ back in May, wowing audiences in Hattingen, Germany, and Aarhus and Copenhagen in Denmark with a pioneering fusion of music, lighting, sound design and projection art. Now ‘Waterworks’ returns to Germany for a series of four performances: after Berlin the orchestra will perform at the Usedom Music Festival in Peenemünde on 26 August, then in Lutherstadt Wittenberg on 27 August, and finally in Hamburg at the Elbphilharmonie on 29 August.

The concerts in Berlin and Hamburg will both be livestreamed. The performance in Berlin is one of seven concerts from this year’s Young Euro Classic festival being livestreamed by European culture channel Arte. Our concert at Hamburg’s Elbphilharmonie will be livestreamed on the Elbphilharmonie website, and will also be broadcast live on a giant screen to spectators in the Plaza outside the venue. The Elbphilharmonie performance will be shown again three times during the Hamburg Cruise Days event from 8 to 10 September.

The music of ‘Waterworks’ focuses on the life-giving power of water, reflecting the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s concern for the environment, and in particular the Baltic Sea itself. ‘This body of water is the engine of the region,’ says Kristjan Järvi, ‘the thing that gives us all our necessities of life. It’s why people settled around here, and it also connects with all the other water across the world.’ This sense of connection has always been central to the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s identity, he says. ‘Just as water is the binding force of humanity, our orchestra is a binding force for the whole Nordic region, from Norway all the way to Russia.’

The ‘Waterworks’ programme includes one of the most famous of all water-themed pieces – Handel’s Water Music, in a special arrangement featuring variations by contemporary composers Charles Coleman and Gene Pritsker. The orchestra also celebrates the 80th birthday of American composer Philip Glass by performing his Aguas da Amazonia – in a new orchestration by Charles Coleman – and his Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’, with Russian-born violinist Mikhail Simonyan as soloist.

‘Waterworks’ heralds an exciting new era for the Baltic Sea Philharmonic, with the introduction of an immersive concert show format in cooperation with Sunbeam Productions that fuses music, lighting, projection art and sound design to stunning effect. The musicians also have a striking new look on stage, thanks to a clothing collaboration with Monton, a leading brand of Estonian fashion house Baltika Group.

The second half of the ‘Waterworks’ tour begins just a few days after the completion of the orchestra’s ‘Baltic Folk’ tour of Sweden, Germany and Italy. On this tour, its second of 2017, the Baltic Sea Philharmonic performed a folk-inspired programme of music by Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff and Arvo Pärt to 2,000 people, and made a daring shift from orchestral convention by playing Stravinsky’s The Firebird entirely from memory.

Download the ‘Waterworks ’ tour programme and book tickets for the remaining tour concerts here.

‘Waterworks’ Tour
Friday, 25 August 2017, 8.00 pm, Berlin (Konzerthaus, Young Euro Classic), Germany
Saturday, 26 August 2017, 8.00 pm, Peenemünde (Usedom Music Festival), Germany
Sunday, 27 August 2017, 7.00 pm, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Germany (open air)
Tuesday, 29 August 2017, 8.00 pm, Hamburg (Elbphilharmonie), Germany

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Gene Pritsker/ Georg Friedrich Handel/ Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 The American Four Seasons
Philip Glass (arranged by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia (2016)

Read More

Rheingau Music Festival to livestream Baltic Sea Philharmonic concert in Wiesbaden on 20 August

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s concert at the 30th Rheingau Music Festival in Germany is to be livestreamed by Medici TV, the world’s leading classical music channel, and on the festival’s website (www.rheingau-musik-festival.de). The broadcast of the concert, at 7.00 pm CET on Sunday 20 August in Wiesbaden’s Kursaal, will be the first ever live stream in the festival’s history. The performance marks a return visit for Kristjan Järvi and the Baltic Sea Philharmonic, who first played at the festival in 2014. The concert in Wiesbaden will be the second of three concerts on the orchestra’s ‘Baltic Folk’ tour of Sweden, Germany and Italy this August.

Kristjan will conduct the orchestra in a folk-inspired programme of music from Estonia and Russia. The concert opens with the contemplative, hymn-like Swansong by Arvo Pärt, the celebrated Estonian composer whose music is both deeply spiritual and emotionally direct. Then we present two of the best-loved orchestral works of the early 20th century: Rachmaninoff’s achingly nostalgic Piano Concerto No. 2 and Stravinsky’s groundbreaking, folktale-inspired ballet The Firebird.

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic will perform The Firebird in its 1945 orchestral suite version, and will make a daring shift from convention by playing the work entirely from memory. Kristjan sees this approach as an evolution in how musicians express themselves as artists. ‘Performing The Firebird from memory is all about chemistry and communication,’ he says. ‘It should feel like the players are improvising music that they have known for a long time.’

Joining the orchestra to perform Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto will be the 15-year-old Russian pianist Alexander Malofeev, one of the most exciting talents of his generation. He says: ‘Rachmaninoff is one of my favourite composers and the Second Piano Concerto expresses his Russian soul. I’ve been dreaming about playing this music for a long time.’

You can also follow the livestream via the Facebook page of the Baltic Sea Philharmonic: www.facebook.com/BalticSeaPhilharmonic

Read More

Baltic Sea Philharmonic launches ‘Baltic Folk’ tour of Sweden, Germany and Italy

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic and Kristjan Järvi have arrived in Visby, on the picturesque Swedish island of Gotland, for the first stop on their new ‘Baltic Folk’ tour. Following six days of intensive rehearsals, the orchestra will take to the stage of the Wisby Strand Concert Hall on Saturday 19 August to perform a folk-inspired programme of music by Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff and Arvo Pärt. The musicians will then travel to Wiesbaden in Germany for a concert the next day as part of the Rheingau Music Festival. The tour concludes on 23 August in Merano, northern Italy, where the orchestra has the honour of opening the Merano Music Festival.

Both festival appearances will be return visits for the Baltic Sea Philharmonic. The orchestra last played at the Merano Music Festival in 2011, and the Rheingau Music Festival is welcoming us back in its 30th anniversary year, after our previous appearance in 2014. The orchestra’s concert in Wiesbaden this month will be the first ever livestreamed event in the history of this prestigious festival to be broadcasted on the festival’s website.

Visby is a special place for the orchestra, and is in many ways the perfect location for the start of our new tour. The Baltic Sea Philharmonic has always been concerned for the environment, and on Gotland, with its picturesque beaches, lakes and rocky outcrops, it’s impossible not to feel deeply connected to nature. One of the best-preserved medieval cities in northern Europe, Visby is also where the idea for the Baltic Sea Youth Philharmonic was born ten years ago in a concert of a project orchestra called the Baltic Youth Orchestra.

‘Baltic Folk’ is the orchestra’s second tour of 2017, after its ‘Waterworks’ tour of Germany and Denmark, which began on 5 May and will conclude this August with a series of concerts in Berlin, Peenemünde, Lutherstadt Wittenberg and Hamburg. For ‘Waterworks’, the Baltic Sea Philharmonic pioneered an immersive concert show format fusing music, lighting, sound design and projection art. With ‘Baltic Folk’ the orchestra will again enter uncharted territory by performing Stravinsky’s The Firebird – in its 1945 orchestral suite version – entirely from memory. For Kristjan, this approach opens up a new world of expression for the musicians. ‘Performing The Firebird from memory is all about chemistry and communication,’ he says. ‘It should feel like the players are improvising music that they have known for a long time.’

Alongside Stravinsky’s groundbreaking ballet music, the ‘Baltic Folk’ programme will feature Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a work that Kristjan calls ‘the most nostalgic, the most Russian-themed concerto ever’. As soloist, we welcome our youngest ever collaborator, the 15-year-old Russian pianist Alexander Malofeev, one of the outstanding talents of his generation.

Preceding the two much-loved Russian works by Rachmaninoff and Stravinsky will be a contemporary piece by the celebrated Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. His contemplative, hymn-like Swansong, which was premiered in 2014, is an orchestration of an earlier choral composition, ‘Littlemore Tractus’.

Download the full ‘Baltic Folk tour programme here.


Baltic Folk Tour 2017
Saturday, 19 August 2017, 7.00 pm
Visby (Congress Hall Wisby Strand, Island of Gotland), Sweden

Sunday, 20 August, 7.00 pm
Rheingau Music Festival, Wiesbaden (Kursaal), Germany

Wednesday, 23 August, 8.30 pm
Merano Music Festival, Merano (Kursaal), Italy

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Alexander Malofeev

Arvo Pärt: Swansong (Littlemore Tractus) for orchestra
Sergei Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2
Igor Stravinsky: The Firebird (1945)

Read More

Baltic Sea Philharmonic gets set for ‘Baltic Folk’ tour of Sweden, Germany and Italy

In just over a month’s time, the Baltic Sea Philharmonic and Kristjan Järvi will be touring Sweden, Germany and Italy with a new, folk-inspired programme of music from Estonia and Russia. ‘Baltic Folk’, the orchestra’s second tour of 2017, begins on 19 August in Visby, on the Swedish island of Gotland. The orchestra then performs at the Rheingau Music Festival in Wiesbaden, Germany, on 20 August, before concluding the tour on 23 August with a performance at the Merano Music Festival in Merano, northern Italy.

The music of ‘Baltic Folk’ has a strong Russian focus. In Stravinsky’s folktale-inspired The Firebird and Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, we present two of the best-loved orchestral works of the early 20th century, both of which reveal their Russian essence in contrasting ways. In his groundbreaking ballet Stravinsky dazzles us with brilliant colours, the vitality of Russian folk music, and the magic of the mythical Firebird. And in one of the most romantic piano concertos ever written, Rachmaninoff bares his soul in dramatic music rich in Slavic melancholy.

The ‘Baltic Folk’ programme begins, however, in the altogether different sound world of Arvo Pärt, the celebrated Estonian composer whose music is both deeply spiritual and emotionally direct. His contemplative, hymn-like Swansong is an orchestration of an earlier choral composition, ‘Littlemore Tractus’, in which Pärt set words from a sermon that the influential theologian John Henry Newman preached in 1843 in the English village of Littlemore.

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic will perform The Firebird in its 1945 orchestral suite version, and will make a daring shift from convention by playing the work entirely from memory. Kristjan sees this approach as an evolution in how musicians express themselves as artists. ‘Performing The Firebird from memory is all about chemistry and communication,’ he says. ‘It should feel like the players are improvising music that they have known for a long time.’

Joining the orchestra to perform Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto, a work that Kristjan calls ‘the most nostalgic, the most Russian-themed concerto ever’, will be the 15-year-old Russian pianist Alexander Malofeev, one of the most exciting talents of his generation. Kristjan says of his new collaborator: ‘Alexander is already a rising star in Russia and has been acclaimed by some of the country’s greatest musicians. I am pleased that we can introduce him to a wider international audience.’

We are delighted to be making return visits to both the Rheingau and Merano festivals, which welcome us back after previous appearances in 2014 (in Wiesbaden) and 2011 (in Merano). And Visby is a special place for us, not just because the island of Gotland is such a beautiful natural environment but also because Visby is where the original idea for the Baltic Sea Youth Philharmonic was born ten years ago, in a concert of a project orchestra called the Baltic Youth Orchestra.

Find out more about ‘Baltic Folk’ and book tickets here.

Baltic Folk Tour 2017
Saturday, 19 August 2017, 7.00 pm
Visby (Congress Hall Wisby Strand, Island of Gotland), Sweden

Sunday, 20 August, 7.00 pm
Rheingau Music Festival, Wiesbaden (Kursaal), Germany

Wednesday, 23 August, 8.30 pm
Merano Music Festival, Merano (Kursaal), Italy

 

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Alexander Malofeev

Arvo Pärt: Swansong (Littlemore Tractus) for orchestra
Sergei Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2
Igor Stravinsky: The Firebird (1945)

Read More

Baltic Sea Philharmonic and Kristjan Järvi complete first half of ‘Waterworks’ tour

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic musicians and Kristjan Järvi have returned home after an exhilarating first half of their ‘Waterworks’ tour of Germany and Denmark. Over 12 days the orchestra travelled 1,500 km and played to more than 8,000 people. The opening concert in Hattingen, Germany, was a sell-out, with standing ovations setting the tone for the subsequent concerts in Copenhagen and Aarhus, which met with an equally positive response. The players now have a three-month break before the ‘Waterworks’ tour continues in Germany in August.

The music of ‘Waterworks’ focuses on the life-giving power of water, reflecting the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s commitment to the environment, and especially to the Baltic Sea itself. ‘This body of water is the engine of the region,’ says Kristjan Järvi, ‘the thing that gives us all our necessities of life. It’s why people settled around here, and it also connects with all the other water across the world.’

The programme includes one of the most famous of all water-themed pieces, Handel’s Water Music, in a special arrangement featuring variations by Charles Coleman and Daniel Schnyder. The orchestra is also celebrating the 80th birthday of American composer Philip Glass by performing Aguas da Amazonia, in an orchestration by Charles Coleman, and Glass’s Violin Concerto No. 2, with Russian-born violinist Mikhail Simonyan as soloist.

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s passion for innovation shone through in the concerts, most noticeably with the introduction of cutting-edge lighting, video art and sound design, which transformed the musical presentation into an immersive concert experience. The musicians also sported a striking new look on stage, thanks to a collaboration with Estonian fashion house Baltika Group. Designers from Monton, one of Baltika’s five international brands, created 13 different outfits for the men and 9 different outfits for the women, all of which were styled to reflect the water theme of the programme.

In another innovation, three members of the New York-based Absolute Ensemble – trumpeter Charlie Porter, bassist Mat Fieldes and percussionist David Rozenblatt – have been embedded in the orchestra. All three featured on Kristjan Järvi’s new recording of Aguas da Amazonia.

Such an innovative approach to performance and repertoire has excited the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s young musicians. Lithuanian violinist Augusta Jusionyté, one of the orchestra’s principals, said: ‘I love having the opportunity to play minimalist music, and what Kristjan is doing – inviting musicians from the Absolute Ensemble, and giving an electronic sound to the orchestra – is what makes this music relevant today. This is what we’re hungry for as musicians, and what makes us very excited.’

Listen to the radio broadcast of the concert in Copenhagen here and watch a video review of the concert in Hattingen here. You can download the ‘Waterworks’ tour programme and book tickets for the remaining tour concerts here.

Read More

Baltic Sea Philharmonic launches clothing partnership with Estonian fashion brandhouse Baltika Group

The players of the Baltic Sea Philharmonic and Kristjan Järvi will be sporting an ultra-stylish look on stage thanks to a new collaboration with Estonian fashion group Baltika. A team of designers at Monton, one of Baltika’s five international brands, has created a range of concert clothing especially for the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s first tour of 2017, ‘Waterworks’. The new outfits, which will be unveiled at the orchestra’s concert in Hattingen, Germany, on 5 May, have been specially designed to reflect the water theme of the programme, with shades of blue, white and grey replacing the dominant black of traditional concert wear.

The break with clothing conventions is part of the bold new presentation concept that the Baltic Sea Philharmonic is pioneering on the ‘Waterworks’ tour – a unique concert experience that fuses music, fashion, light, visual art and sound design. Kristjan Järvi says: ‘The sense of unity that we want to achieve between the music, the projections, the lighting and the sound design also incorporates the clothing of the orchestra. Everything is part of an organic whole, a unified artistic concept, and that includes how the orchestra looks on stage, the way its clothes represent the different colours of water, and the way the light reflects off the various materials.’

The ‘Waterworks’ tour marks the start of a long-term collaboration planned by the Baltika Group and the Baltic Sea Philharmonic. While Baltika has a design heritage stretching back almost 90 years, Monton is a product of the 21st century. Established in 2002 – making it only a few years older than the Baltic Sea Philharmonic – Monton has become the most successful Estonian fashion brand in the world.

Monton’s outfits for the Baltic Sea Philharmonic draw on the brand’s spring/summer 2017 collection ‘Duality’, which takes inspiration from two very different islands: Cuba and Iceland. It’s the second of these islands, with its geysers, waterfalls, glaciers and surrounding seas, that inspired the design for the orchestra’s clothing. Maire Milder, Baltika Group’s Branding and Retail Concept Director, says: ‘The styling for “Waterworks” uses a black‒grey‒white‒navy colour palette, with sky blue for the accent. It’s a rather minimalistic styling where details act as focal points: pleats imitate water flow and movement, and sheer tulle and straight-cut edges represent the qualities of ice.’

Monton’s designers were also careful to consider the musicians’ need for comfortable concert clothing, a fact keenly appreciated by Kristjan Järvi. He says: ‘Monton’s clothing is the kind that allows a musician to move around naturally. And while comfort is paramount, it’s rare for orchestral musicians to have comfortable performance clothes that are so stylish. So we are breaking new ground, both in terms of fashion and in how the stage design and lighting is enhanced by the look of an orchestra.’

Take a look behind the scenes of the fitting of the outfits on our Facebook page and find out more about Baltika Group here.

Read More

Baltic Sea Philharmonic embarks on ‘Waterworks’ tour of Germany and Denmark

The Baltic Sea Philharmonic sets off this week on its first tour of 2017. After opening with a performance in Hattingen, Germany, the ‘Waterworks’ tour takes the orchestra to Copenhagen and Aarhus, Denmark, from 7 to 10 May, before resuming in August in Germany with performances in Berlin, Peenemünde, Lutherstadt Wittenberg and Hamburg.

The repertoire for the tour celebrates the life-giving power of water and also the 80th birthday of composer Philip Glass. The Baltic Sea Philharmonic and Kristjan Järvi perform a special arrangement of Handel’s Water Music and a new orchestration of Glass’s Aguas da Amazonia, and Russian-born violinist Mikhail Simonyan joins the orchestra for Glass’s Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’.

The programme reflects the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s commitment to the environment and its passion for connecting people through music, says Kristjan Järvi: ‘Water is the essence of life, not only within our physical bodies but also in the body of water that dominates this region – the Baltic Sea. It’s the engine of the region, it’s why people settled around here, and it connects with all the other water across the world. The music of “Waterworks” represents how we are from this region, but are also connected to the whole world. It doesn’t matter whether it’s the waters of the Baltic or the Amazon: everything is connected.’

There is special excitement surrounding the ‘Waterworks’ tour because it marks the start of a radical new approach to presenting orchestral music. The Baltic Sea Philharmonic is collaborating with lighting designer Bertil Mark, sound designer Chris Ekers and projection artist Philipp Geist to reimagine the concert experience, immersing audiences in a thrilling world of music, light, images and sound. ‘Concert goers should feel like they are entering a new dimension, a world where anything is possible,’ says Kristjan Järvi.

Find out more and book tickets here and download our new ‘Waterworks’ tour programme.

‘Waterworks’ Tour
Friday, 5 May 2017, 7.00 pm, Hattingen (LWL-Industriemuseum Henrichshütte), Germany
Sunday, 7 May 2017, 3.00 pm, Copenhagen (DR Concert Hall), Denmark
Monday, 8 May 2016, 9.00 am, 11.00 am, 1.00 pm, Copenhagen (DR Concert Hall), Denmark (school concerts)
Tuesday, 9 May 2017, 7.00 pm, Aarhus (Musikhuset), Denmark
Wednesday, 10 May 2017, 9.00 am, 11.00 am, 1.00 pm, Aarhus (Musikhuset), Denmark (school concerts)
***
Friday, 25 August 2017, 8.00 pm, Berlin (Konzerthaus, Young Euro Classic), Germany
Saturday, 26 August 2017, 8.00 pm, Peenemünde (Usedom Music Festival), Germany
Sunday, 27 August 2017, 7.00 pm, Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Germany (open air)
Tuesday, 29 August 2017, 8.00 pm, Hamburg (Elbphilharmonie), Germany

Programme
Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Georg Friedrich Handel/Daniel Schnyder/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

Read More

Live on Mezzo TV – ‘Baltic Sea Landscapes’ Concert from Moscow

 

Relive one of the highlights of our April 2016 tour later this month, as Mezzo broadcasts the Moscow concert of our ‘Baltic Sea Landscapes’ visit around the Baltic Sea states

The concert took place on 23 April 2016 in the Moscow’s Tchaikovsky Hall, as a celebration of the 125th anniversary of the birth of Sergei Prokofiev. It featured renowned Prokofiev exponent Alexander Toradze performing the composer’s Third Piano Concerto, and the First Symphony, under the baton of Kristjan Järvi. The rest of the programme reflected the orchestra’s championing of the environment: Arvo Pärt’s Swansong, Gediminas Gelgotas’s Mountains. Waters. (Freedom), and Igor Stravinsky’s The Firebird.

This is the third time Mezzo has broadcast our concerts – it previously transmitted BYP’s ‘Live from the Berlin Philharmonie’ from a January 2014 concert, and its Paris debut, from March 2015. The French television station launched in 1992, and now transmits across 44 countries to 18 million subscribers.

Tune in to Mezzo here on 21 January 2017, 8.30 pm CET to watch the concert. Further broadcasting dates here.

Read More
1 2 3 4 6